Fun with Kites

Today, we went to the Franklin Park Kite Festival, outside Boston’s Franklin Park Zoo. Lots of small children running and running (or “wunning and wunning,” to hear them tell it), often in the wrong direction (with the wind) and often at their parents’ instruction. It’s been a looong time since I flew a kite, but as I recall, once it’s flying high, you can stop running, and stand in one spot. Not these kids. The higher the kite got, the faster they ran (with the wind. Sigh). Still, a lot of fun, though.

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As always, to enlarge a photo, click on it.

Do you have memories of kite flying as a child, or with your children? This event looked like it was a lot more fun for the parents than the kids. As I often observe at this sort of event, parents work very, very hard to make sure their kids have a good time, and most of the time, the kid would be happier playing with a box.

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Fluff Festival

Saturday was the annual Fluff Festival in Somerville, Mass. Like me, many of you are probably wondering what Fluff is (I’d heard of a “fluffernutter,” but I didn’t know what it was until my co-workers enlightened me a few months ago). Fluff is a brand name for what most of us call marshmallow creme. In New England, however, it’s Fluff. Somerville is where Fluff was invented, and its factory currently resides, so it’s only natural that the town would want to celebrate Fluff. This was the eighth annual “What the Fluff?” celebration.

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The very Fluff used in the Fluff Jousting competition.

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Did somebody say “Fluff Jousting?” So messy, but fun.

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Waiting for the next group of jousters.

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Marshmallow guns were selling like hotcakes, and the marshmallows all over the roads and sidewalk were their own sort of marshmallow creme on the bottoms of revelers’ shoes.

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The Flufferettes with a past Pharoah of Fluff (a Whoopie Pie-rate).

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Fluff-licking contest.

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A contestant after “Blind Man’s Fluff,” in which teams of two (one blindfolded), make and eat a fluffernutter. In order to win, the teammate whose mouth is full of peanut butter and fluff must sing the Fluff jingle.